David Copperfield – Day 240 of 331

Chapter 45: Mr. Dick Fulfils My Aunt’s Predictions

It was some time now, since I had left the Doctor. Living in his neighbourhood, I saw him frequently; and we all went to his house on two or three occasions to dinner or tea. The Old Soldier was in permanent quarters under the Doctor’s roof. She was exactly the same as ever, and the same immortal butterflies hovered over her cap.

Like some other mothers, whom I have known in the course of my life, Mrs. Markleham was far more fond of pleasure than her daughter was. She required a great deal of amusement, and, like a deep old soldier, pretended, in consulting her own inclinations, to be devoting herself to her child. The Doctor’s desire that Annie should be entertained, was therefore particularly acceptable to this excellent parent; who expressed unqualified approval of his discretion.

I have no doubt, indeed, that she probed the Doctor’s wound without knowing it. Meaning nothing but a certain matured frivolity and selfishness, not always inseparable from full-blown years, I think she confirmed him in his fear that he was a constraint upon his young wife, and that there was no congeniality of feeling between them, by so strongly commending his design of lightening the load of her life.

“My dear soul,” she said to him one day when I was present, “you know there is no doubt it would be a little pokey for Annie to be always shut up here.”

The Doctor nodded his benevolent head. “When she comes to her mother’s age,” said Mrs. Markleham, with a flourish of her fan, “then it’ll be another thing. You might put me into a Jail, with genteel society and a rubber, and I should never care to come out. But I am not Annie, you know; and Annie is not her mother.”

“Surely, surely,” said the Doctor.

“You are the best of creatures—no, I beg your pardon!” for the Doctor made a gesture of deprecation, “I must say before your face, as I always say behind your back, you are the best of creatures; but of course you don’t—now do you? —enter into the same pursuits and fancies as Annie?”

“No,” said the Doctor, in a sorrowful tone.

“No, of course not,” retorted the Old Soldier. “Take your Dictionary, for example. What a useful work a Dictionary is! What a necessary work! The meanings of words! Without Doctor Johnson, or somebody of that sort, we might have been at this present moment calling an Italian-iron, a bedstead. But we can’t expect a Dictionary—especially when it’s making—to interest Annie, can we?”

The Doctor shook his head.

“And that’s why I so much approve,” said Mrs. Markleham, tapping him on the shoulder with her shut-up fan, “of your thoughtfulness. It shows that you don’t expect, as many elderly people do expect, old heads on young shoulders. You have studied Annie’s character, and you understand it. That’s what I find so charming!”

Even the calm and patient face of Doctor Strong expressed some little sense of pain, I thought, under the infliction of these compliments.

“Therefore, my dear Doctor,” said the Old Soldier, giving him several affectionate taps, “you may command me, at all times and seasons. Now, do understand that I am entirely at your service. I am ready to go with Annie to operas, concerts, exhibitions, all kinds of places; and you shall never find that I am tired. Duty, my dear Doctor, before every consideration in the universe!”

She was as good as her word. She was one of those people who can bear a great deal of pleasure, and she never flinched in her perseverance in the cause. She seldom got hold of the newspaper (which she settled herself down in the softest chair in the house to read through an eye-glass, every day, for two hours), but she found out something that she was certain Annie would like to see. It was in vain for Annie to protest that she was weary of such things. Her mother’s remonstrance always was, “Now, my dear Annie, I am sure you know better; and I must tell you, my love, that you are not making a proper return for the kindness of Doctor Strong.”

Comments

  1. ScottS-M Identicon Icon

    ScottS-M wrote:

    You might put me into a Jail, with genteel society and a rubber, and I should never care to come out.

    I guess rubber meant something else back then. Not sure what though.

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